Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Shadow and Other Napoleonic Tales

by

Arthur Conan Doyle

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THE GREAT SHADOW AND OTHER NAPOLEONIC TALES

A. CONAN DOYLE

CONTENTS

THE GREAT SHADOW

I. THE NIGHT OF THE BEACONS

II. COUSIN EDIE OF EYEMOUTH

III. THE SHADOW ON THE WATERS

IV. THE CHOOSING OF JIM

V. THE MAN FROM THE SEA

VI. A WANDERING EAGLE

VII. THE SHADOW ON THE LAND

VIII. THE COMING OF THE CUTTER

IX. THE DOINGS AT WEST INCH

X. THE RETURN OF THE SHADOW

XI. THE GATHERING OF THE NATIONS

XII. THE SHADOW ON THE LAND

XIII. THE END OF THE STORM

XIV. THE TALLY OF DEATH

XV. THE END OF IT

THE CRIME OF THE BRIGADIER

THE "SLAPPING SAL"

THE GREAT SHADOW.

CHAPTER I.

THE NIGHT OF THE BEACONS.

It is strange to me, Jock Calder of West Inch, to feel that though now, in the very centre of the nineteenth century, I am but five-and-fifty years of age, and though it is only once in a week perhaps that my wife can pluck out a little grey bristle from over my ear, yet I have lived in a time when the thoughts and the ways of men were as different as though it were another planet from this. For when I walk in my fields I can see, down Berwick way, the little fluffs of white smoke which tell me of this strange new hundred-legged beast, with coals for food and a thousand men in its belly, for ever crawling over the border. On a shiny day I can see the glint of the brass work as it takes the curve near Corriemuir; and then, as I look out to sea, there is the same beast again, or a dozen of them maybe, leaving a trail of black in the air and of white in the water, and swimming in the face of the wind as easily as a salmon up the Tweed. Such a sight as that would have struck my good old father speechless with wrath as well as surprise; for he was so stricken with the fear of offending the Creator that he was chary of contradicting Nature, and always held the new thing to be nearly akin to the blasphemous. As long as God made the horse, and a man down Birmingham way the engine, my good old dad would have stuck by the saddle and the spurs.

But he would have been still more surprised had he seen the peace and kindliness which reigns now in the hearts of men, and the talk in the papers and at the meetings that there is to be no more war--save, of course, with blacks and such like. For when he died we had been fighting with scarce a break, save only during two short years, for very nearly a quarter of a century. Think of it, you who live so quietly and peacefully now! Babies who were born in the war grew to be bearded men with babies of their own, and still the war continued. Those who had served and fought in their stalwart prime grew stiff and bent, and yet the ships and the armies were struggling. It was no wonder that folk came at last to look upon it as the natural state, and thought how queer it must seem to be at peace. During that long time we fought the Dutch, we fought the Danes, we fought the Spanish, we fought the Turks, we fought the Americans, we fought the Monte-Videans, until it seemed that in this universal struggle no race was too near of kin, or too far away, to be drawn into the quarrel. But most of all it was the French whom we fought, and the man whom of all others we loathed and feared and admired was the great Captain who ruled them.

It was very well to draw pictures of him, and sing songs about him, and make as though he were an impostor; but I can tell you that the fear of that man hung like a black shadow over all Europe, and that there was a time when the glint of a fire at night upon the coast would set every woman upon her knees and every man gripping for his musket. He had always won: that was the terror of it. The Fates seemed to be behind him. And now we knew that he lay upon the northern coast with a hundred and fifty thousand veterans, and the boats for their passage. But it is an old story, how a third of the grown folk of our country took up arms, and how our little one-eyed, one-armed man crushed their fleet. There was still to be a land of free thinking and free speaking in Europe.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
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