James Barrie
Tommy and Grizel

by

James Barrie

Free Public Domain E-Books from the
Classic Literature Library

Tommy and Grizel Page 01

TOMMY AND GRIZEL

BY

J. M. BARRIE

ILLUSTRATED BY BERNARD PARTRIDGE

1900, 1912

CONTENTS

PART I

CHAPTER

I HOW TOMMY FOUND A WAY

II THE SEARCH FOR THE TREASURE

III SANDYS ON WOMAN

IV GRIZEL OF THE CROOKED SMILE

V THE TOMMY MYTH

VI GHOSTS THAT HAUNT THE DEN

VII THE BEGINNING OF THE DUEL

VIII WHAT GRIZEL'S EYES SAID

IX GALLANT BEHAVIOUR OF T. SANDYS

X GAVINIA ON THE TRACK

XI THE TEA-PARTY

XII IN WHICH A COMEDIAN CHALLENGES TRAGEDY TO BOWLS

XIII LITTLE WELLS OF GLADNESS

XIV ELSPETH

XV BY PROSEN WATER

XVI "HOW COULD YOU HURT YOUR GRIZEL SO!"

XVII HOW TOMMY SAVED THE FLAG

PART II

CHAPTER

XVIII THE GIRL SHE HAD BEEN

XIX OF THE CHANGE IN THOMAS

XX A LOVE-LETTER

XXI THE ATTEMPT TO CARRY ELSPETH BY NUMBERS

XXII GRIZEL'S GLORIOUS HOUR

XXIII TOMMY LOSES GRIZEL

XXIV THE MONSTER

XXV MR. T. SANDYS HAS RETURNED TO TOWN

XXVI GRIZEL ALL ALONE

XXVII GRIZEL'S JOURNEY

XXVIII TWO OF THEM

XXIX THE RED LIGHT

XXX THE LITTLE GODS DESERT HIM

XXXI "THE MAN WITH THE GREETIN' EYES"

XXXII TOMMY'S BEST WORK

XXXIII THE LITTLE GODS RETURN WITH A LADY

XXXIV A WAY IS FOUND FOR TOMMY

XXXV THE PERFECT LOVER

ILLUSTRATIONS

PART I

And clung to it, his teeth set.

"She is standing behind that tree looking at us."

She did not look up, she waited.

PART II

"I sit still by his arm-chair and tell him what is happening to his Grizel."

They told Aaron something.

"But my friends still call me Mrs. Jerry," she said softly.

"I woke up," she said He heard their seductive voices, they danced around him in numbers.

TOMMY AND GRIZEL

PART I

CHAPTER I

HOW TOMMY FOUND A WAY

O.P. Pym, the colossal Pym, that vast and rolling figure, who never knew what he was to write about until he dipped grandly, an author in such demand that on the foggy evening which starts our story his publishers have had his boots removed lest he slip thoughtlessly round the corner before his work is done, as was the great man's way--shall we begin with him, or with Tommy, who has just arrived in London, carrying his little box and leading a lady by the hand? It was Pym, as we are about to see, who in the beginning held Tommy up to the public gaze, Pym who first noticed his remarkable indifference to female society, Pym who gave him----But alack! does no one remember Pym for himself? Is the king of the Penny Number already no more than a button that once upon a time kept Tommy's person together? And we are at the night when they first met! Let us hasten into Marylebone before little Tommy arrives and Pym is swallowed like an oyster.

This is the house, 22 Little Owlet Street, Marylebone, but which were his rooms it is less easy to determine, for he was a lodger who flitted placidly from floor to floor according to the state of his finances, carrying his apparel and other belongings in one great armful, and spilling by the way. On this particular evening he was on the second floor front, which had a fireplace in the corner, furniture all his landlady's and mostly horsehair, little to suggest his calling save a noble saucerful of ink, and nothing to draw attention from Pym, who lolled, gross and massive, on a sofa, one leg over the back of it, the other drooping, his arms extended, and his pipe, which he could find nowhere, thrust between the buttons of his waistcoat, an agreeable pipe-rack. He wore a yellow dressing-gown, or could scarcely be said to wear it, for such of it as was not round his neck he had converted into a cushion for his head, which is perhaps the part of him we should have turned to first It was a big round head, the plentiful gray hair in tangles, possibly because in Pym's last flitting the comb had dropped over the banisters; the features were ugly and beyond life-size, yet the forehead had altered little except in colour since the day when he was near being made a fellow of his college; there was sensitiveness left in the thick nose, humour in the eyes, though they so often watered; the face had gone to flabbiness at last, but not without some lines and dents, as if the head had resisted the body for a space before the whole man rolled contentedly downhill.

Please Support the Classic Literature Library

Buy James Barrie Books from Amazon.com

Tommy and Grizel Page 02

James Barrie

Scottish Authors

Free Books in the public domain from the Classic Literature Library ©

Sir James Barrie
Classic Literature Library
Classic Authors

All Pages of This Book
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Tom Sawyer Abroad