98, first col.

(p. 98, first col. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"Enter WAGNER.

WAGNER. I think my master means to die shortly, For he hath given to me all his goods: And yet, methinks, if that death were near, He would not banquet, and carouse, and swill Amongst the students, as even now he doth, Who are at supper with such belly-cheer As Wagner ne'er beheld in all his life. See, where they come! belike the feast is ended. [Exit.]")

(230) goods] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "good."

(231) ne'er] so 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "neuer."

(232) ended] so 4tos 1624, 1631, (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616 "done."

(233) war] Old eds. "warres."

(234) wit] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "will."

(235) Or envy of thee] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "Or OF enuie TO thee."

(236) MEPHIST.] This and the next prefix are omitted in the old eds.

(237) torments] So 4tos 1624, 1631 (and so 4to 1604).--2to 1616 "torment."

(238) I may afflict] So 4to 1616.--2to 1624 "I afflict."--2to 1631 "I CAN afflict."

(239) clean] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "clear."

(240) oath] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "vow."

(241) evening] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "euenings."

(242) azur'd] So 4to 1624 (a reading which I prefer only because it is also that of 4to 1604.)--2tos 1616, 1631, "azure."

(243) shalt] See note *, p. 100.

(Note *, from p. 100. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"shalt] So all the 4tos; and so I believe Marlowe wrote, though the grammar requires "shall."")

(244) his] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

(245) Gramercy] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "Gramercies."

(246) sir] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--Not in 4to 1631.

(247) of deadly] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "of A deadly."

(248) me] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

(249) never] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "nere."

(250) 'tis] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "IT is."

(251) And led thine eye] A portion of this line has evidently dropt out.

(252) Exit] It seems doubtful whether Lucifer and Belzebub should also make their exeunt here, or whether they remain to witness the catastrophe: see p. 132, first col.

(P. 132, first column. (this play):

"MEPHIST. And, this gloomy night, Here, in this room, will wretched Faustus be.

BELZEBUB. And here we'll stay, To mark him how he doth demean himself." etc.)

(253) hell-pains] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "HELS paines."

(254) sit] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "set."

(255) are open] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "IS READIE."

(256) boil] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "BROYLE."

(257) See, where Christ's blood streams in the firmament] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

(258) an] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "and."

(259) hath] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "haue."

(260) yon] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "your."

(261) you, &c.] See note *, p. 101.

(Note *, from p. 101. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"That, when you, &c.] So all the old eds.; and it is certain that awkward changes of person are sometimes found in passages of our early poets: but qy.,-- "That, when THEY vomit forth into the air, My limbs may issue from THEIR smoky mouths," &c.?")

(262) 0, if, &c.] 2to 1604, in the corresponding passage, has "Oh, GOD, if," &c. (see p. 101, sec. col.), and that reading seems necessary for the sense.

(P. 101, sec. col. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"Ah, half the hour is past! 'twill all be past anon O God, If thou wilt not have mercy on my soul, Yet for Christ's sake, whose blood hath ransom'd me, Impose some end to my incessant pain;" etc.)

(263) at last] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "at THE last."

(264) Enter Scholars] Here, of course, a change of scene is supposed. (This is not in the earlier play.)

(265) heaven] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "heauens."

(266) devils .

Christopher Marlowe
Classic Literature Library
Classic Authors

All Pages of This Book